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In The Crosshairs
Charles Blathras, NRP, FP-C, C-NPT, EMT-P, CMTE and Kenneth Panciocco, EMT, CFC, CMTE, Boston MedFlight

All good transport programs have a strong communications center that drives their program. It’s the nucleus of the program but an area that always seems to be in the crosshairs. We will discuss the challenges of recruiting the right people, what the right questions that arise , the scenarios, and second-guessing that they encounter on a daily basis. We will also look at the steps one program took to mentor, train, and build the confidence and autonomy that play an integral part to their overall success.

Long Distance Relationships, Do They Work? Side By Side Or Miles Apart…Always Connected
Brandon Eckard, CFC and Samuel Keller, CFC, MedComm

Whether you are many miles apart, state’s apart or maybe even further, the long distance relationship can be tough and require constant work, dedication and communication. This session will spotlight how MedComm overcomes the distance and logistical challenges to provide their dispatching clients with needed and expected elements to make their individual missions safe and successful. Learn how communications specialists provide best-in-class customer service while processing requests for transports that include everything from ambulette, to Emergency and Non-Emergency ALS/BLS, to Mobile ICU, to Rotor-wing and Fixed-wing and from neonatal to adult. Learn how MedComm provides a full service commitment, operating with a One-Call-Does-It-All approach and how real-time data and metrics support the multiple air and ground transport programs they serve. Learn more about the training program for the communicators and learn how the leadership structure of MedComm provides each program their direct link to MedComm. Finally, learn how MedComm’s constant work, dedication and communication is making each one of our long distance relationships successful.

There and Back Again: A Communication Center’s Story
Richard L. Swedbergh, EMT-B, FP-C, CMTE (MBA 12/18) and Amanda Wigman, CFC Guardian Air

Guardian Air had to learn the hard way what happens when you don’t manage a communication center well. The program ultimately had the communication center combined with a ground service dispatch. This resulted in a systematic failure of service and ultimately resulted in plans to close the communication center and outsource to a vendor for flight dispatch services. The staff who were faced with the possibility of losing their jobs rose up to fight for what they believed they could create, and helped to win over hospital leadership to support and finance the building of a brand new communication center, going from Guardian Air’s black sheep to one of the true highlights of our program.